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Sunday, 27 May 2012

Weaning in the Wain

57 mm of glorious rain fell here on Friday.  As well as making conditions rather wet,


we're also experiencing a little Winter-like frigidity.


Cold for us anyway.
As I lay in bed Friday night listening to rain on the roof, I felt for the organisers of our local campdraft, who did manage to continue with the draft, though not as pleasant as it could have been.  I envisaged a weekend spent indoors, my husband had other ideas.  With our next six weekends already pre-filled, much of that dependent on this weekend's weaning, we apparently needed to follow the plan.


The only detour from plan, the inclusion of gumboots.  And with conditions less than perfect it was decided to leave the two youngest team members with Nanny and Grandad.  Sometimes less really is more.


And so we headed to Bottle Tree,


emptied 48 mm from the guage, and weaned.


These two old dolls, destined for the meatworks, surprising us with these little gifts.  Out of season calves,


welcome none-the-less.

We left Bottle Tree late this evening, a yard full of bellowing babies left behind.  We return tomorrow to load trucks.  These weaner steers,


having been counted by Sarah,


then weighed by Jessie, to be collected by their new owner tomorrow.

Their sisters will be loaded and brought back to Rock Wallaby.


The last paddock of stud breeders here to be back-loaded to Bottle Tree.


 Rock Wallaby here-forth used to grow out heifers, handling dry cattle far better than wet.



And Bottle Tree will continue to delight us with these happy, sappy weaners.

An early cool start tomorrow.

14 comments:

  1. AAh yes we keep the cows and calves closer and the fat steers and heifers deeper/further in- and closer to the yards for loading. That way we are driving through the cows all the time and I guess see/check them twice as often. I can't wait for our calves to drop in june/july! I love watching those babies.

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  2. Surely the two old girls have bought themselves a stay of execution with their unexpected calves?

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  3. A beautiful sunset - and the "old dolls" knew exactly what they had to do to win a reprieve. So much for a weekend spent indoors but sometimes you just have to follow the plan! Mare

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  4. Just wish it would wain here.

    Beautiful cattle.

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  5. well it wained here too (not much but wretchedly miserably cold, and I DON"T have gumboots. On the shopping list if this rain malarky is going to continue!) and thankfully husband here saw sense (depsite also weekends being full for the next ?) and our weaning postponed until next week. Don't have the heart to tell him there is rain forcast for the end of this week again (which doesn't herald well for our local Show)

    I have to say your weaners look like sumo wrestlers in comparison to ours. I will be ashamed to photograph the poor little dears, as the drafter (me) has been told to be harsh but firm in my assesment of being big enough to wean.

    we too grow our weaners out elsewhere, finding that maturing on softer country gives us earlier conception rates, dropping their first calf (and toughing up a bit) before moving to the breeder block. Steers are weaned and then transported to the downs paddock to chub up :-)

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  6. And here in charming M'brgh, the show was held on Friday and Saturday when the rain poured down. Of course Sunday dawned clear as a bell and comfortably warm. I take my hat off to the committee who had to watch a years hard work washed down the drain. That's life in the bush hey?

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  7. Beautiful pictures!!! I would love a copy of the first one, Never saw a sunset so beautiful.

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  8. Are we living parallel lives? Almost...
    ;-)
    BB

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  9. Weaning time was always so noisy at our house. Mom liked to keep the babies close to the house so she could watch them and neither calf nor dam was ever quiet about weaning time!

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  10. Can you explain what is weaning time to some of us that live in the city. I never been to a cattle farm. Dont think i ever touched a caow.

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    1. I'll get right onto that Lisa. Stay tuned.

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  11. Smart old girls eh?
    I dunno, but in the first photo of the herd, the cow on the right hand side of the photo, above the gate post, looks like a jersey to my eyes. Or am I imagining things???
    Your cattle, Fiona, look in great nick as does the countryside.
    Miserable day here in Brisbane, started raining last night and hasn't stopped.
    And I am off to "my friendly and very cheeky" butcher, Steve, today for supplies at Toowong! Yuck!
    Serves me right for not going yesterday.
    Cheers
    Colin

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