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Monday, 30 July 2012

Cool days, Calves & Kids

The weekend saw us head to Bottle Tree to take off the last round of weaners.  Full dams


and a full complement of feed doing wonders for the soul.


Cool Winter days left Wallace wishing he's brought his jacket, as reminded. 


Though he did remember the gun.


Sal kept a watchful eye,


as Dad ran horses.


These three dears caught in the wrong place at the wrong time, given a fright by the thundering horses behind them.


Horses came in looking a little wild and woolly with their winter coats in place.

 
Though obviously wintering well, as girths barely seemed to stretch around their midriffs.  Kids also growing, with stirrup leathers having to be lengthened a hole or two.

These weaners not quite as heavy as their mates who came off two months ago, 


a situation we hope to remedy as we work on reducing the calving window and have them all falling early.  Sal caught up with her much loved pet heifer Helen,


when not working the crush.


With all calves taken off, we drafted the breeders into paddocks based on breed and type.


So we've now a paddock of blackies, a paddock of creamies,


as well as the larger paddock of reds and of course the precious grey stud paddocks.  With plenty of heifers, as well as cows looking like this, it won't be long before we're brimming over with calves again.


Jess climbed a rung on the ladder of child labour this weekend, 


given the stressful task of manning the headbail, where the boldest and bravest take their place.  As well as a little height and a little strength, one must have a fairly thick skin.  For if you happen to let one through you won't hear the end of it.  Fortunately Jess made no such slip-ups.

I'm not quite sure what these ones were up to.



Tracking, by the looks.

We arrived home in the cold and dark last night.  Unco-operative weaners not wanting to come off the truck.  Not keen to experience the spear-grass environment perhaps.

10 comments:

  1. gee, the country is looking GREAT!

    and love a nice line of cows in the one paddock, we did have all of our greys seperated with Rainbow and Teabag, but now they have been infiltrated by some red (but high content) sisters.

    Jessie is a better man than me, its with reluctance that I take on the head bail. Fortunately I normally have good reason, the thing being built to be driven by taller and stronger people than me! (yours looks to be quite user friendly though!)

    and good grief, how that boy has grown! being coatless or with no sense of feeling has not stunted his growth!

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    Replies
    1. Yes, the boy informed me just yesterday that he feels hungry ALL the time! I'm grateful to have had one boy and three girls, not the other way round. I've heard mothers of boys comment that boarding school isn't so dear when you know how much they eat!
      And I'm thinking maybe working the headbail is much like the towing scenario ... most grief seen when working involves the husband-wife combo.

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    2. oh my lawd yes, totally agree. The husband-wife working combo really should be avoided at all costs, unless seperated by at least 2kms and a crackly (even better non working) two way. Peace then reigns supreme :)

      (but of course, we wouldn't have it any other way.)

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  2. ps glad your lot have more imagination in naming their calves. We still have Poddy (Mark 1)coming through the breeder herd. She still hasn't forgiven us for weaning her - 8 years ago - but will submit to a bum scratch without fighting. Its been said that she will Never Be Culled, but instead brought home to be spoilt in her old age and live around the house at the inlaws.

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  3. How much do I love that the pet cow is called Helen. I love it. Beautiful.

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  4. Beautiful pics Fiona and the kids look like they are enjoying themselves. Love the close up of Sal..those big brown eyes!

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  5. Fantastic report, Fiona, on a day's activities in your area. The countryside does look great.
    Interesting how you seperate the cattle by colours?
    No way in my youth was a kid allowed to do what your two daughters are doing with the chutes!
    However, way back then, the gate chutes were a bit more primitive - ha ha!
    I often wondered why I was sent off to boarding college - I didn't realise that I ate so much!!!
    Great post.
    Cheers
    Colin (HB)

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  6. I love fallowing your posts, it's like watching my kids growing up all over................... :)

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  7. There's nothing quite like a good season! we are having a great one too!

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  8. Classic Australian farming life right there Fiona. Absolutely gorgeous shots. Reminds me so much of the times I spent on weekends and holidays at my friends sheep and cattle property in country NSW which bordered our little hobby farm. I love the kids shirts too! Melx

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